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Mankunku Quartet - Yakhal' Inkomo

Mankunku Quartet - Yakhal' Inkomo
Performer: Mankunku Quartet
Title: Yakhal' Inkomo
Country: South Africa
Genre: Jazz
Style:Hard Bop, Modal
Released: 1968
Catalog number: ORL 6022
Label: World Record Co.
MP3 album szie: 1264 mb
FLAC album size: 1905 mb

Tracklist

1Bessie's Blues
Written-By – Coltrane
7:35
2Doodlin'
Written-By – Silver
6:06
3Dedication (To Daddy Trane And Brother Shorter)
Written-By – Ngozi
10:15
4Yakhal' Inkomo
Written-By – Ngozi
8:53

Credits

  • BassAgrippa Magwaza
  • DrumsEarly Mabuza
  • Photography ByAlf Khumalo
  • PianoLionel Pillay
  • Producer, Liner NotesRay Nkwe
  • Recorded ByDave Challen
  • Tenor SaxophoneWinston "Mankunku" Ngozi

Notes

Recorded on 23 July, 1968 in the Johannesburg Studios of Manley Van Niekerk

"Ah... at last it's done. I mean the recording of South Africa's number one tenor sax player, Winston "Mankunku" Ngozi. This is the LP that every jazz fan has been waiting for. Listen to it from side one to the last note on side two then you'll agree with me that this is jazz, dished out by the son of the soil in a soul/jazz bowl.

About the man himself. He was born on 21st June 1943 in Retreat, Cape Province. He started playing the piano at the age of ten and two years later bought a tenor saxophone. "Mankunku," as he is called, started to take music seriously in the early sixties. His first professional engagement was with Alf Herbert's African Jazz and Variety and thereafter with South Africa's greatest bassist Midge Pike of Cape Town, about whom he said "Midge was really the man behind my success. He really helped me a lot, I take my hat off to him, dad — I will always remember him." I asked him who influenced his playing. "Daddy Trane and Brother Shorter," he said. "Is that why you composed a tune called "Dedication?" "Yes dad, I feel like crying every time I listen to the music of these two men." I first heard Mankunku play in 1967, during the La Vern Baker/George "Stardust" Green tour. I am sure that many a jazz fan will agree with me that he was the star of the show.

On the first side of this LP is "Yakhal Inkomo" (one of his original works), literally translated "Bellowing Bull." The sound of a bull bellowing mournfully at the loss of one of his kind, is one from deep down in the heart. It is with this sound captured musically, that Mankunku expresses his deep grief at the loss of one of the greatest tenor players in the world, Daddy Trane, as he calls the late John Coltrane. If you listen to the early recordings of John Coltrane — for example "Blue Train," "Moments Notice" and Wayne Snorter's "Johnny's Blues" and "Noise in the Attic," you will agree with him that he was influenced by them. The second tune is also his own composition — "Dedication" (to Daddy Trane and Brother Shorter). It is a 4/4, which is so well arranged that I could hardly believe that it is his original work — with this tune he really plays his part. He plays himself. I remember during the recording session he didn't want anyone to move about because such movements disturb his feelings and concentration. The other tunes are his choice. From Horrace Silver's works he chose "Doodlin"' and from Coltrane's "Bessie's Blues."

About the trio that provided the background, he said "they are fabulous dad, they are with me all the time. When I reach the climax, they are there with me — I love working with them." That, I myself believe, because while recording "Yakhal' Inkomo" I saw tears rolling down his cheeks after Lionel Pillay's piano solo. Everyone there was thrilled to hear Lionel play with such feeling, a real down-to-earth feeling. The Early Mabuza Trio played and played — they deserve full marks." — RAY NKWE President of the Jazz Appreciation Society of South Africa

Companies

  • Printed By – Artone Press
  • Published By – Laetrec
  • Published By – Essex Music
  • Published By – Jowcol Music
  • Recorded At – Manley van Niekerk Studios, Johannesburg

Short intro

Yakhal Inkomo, 2. Dedication To Daddy Trane And Brother Shorter, 3. Doodlin, 4. Bessies Blues. Please wait. Wrong audioTry another Yakhal Inkomo. Mankunku Quartet. 4 tracks. Released in 1968. Yakhal Inkomo. Dedication To Daddy Trane And Brother Shorter. Album 2007 9 Songs. Yakhal' Inkomo. Winston Mankunku Ngozi. Jazz 2007. Listen free to Mankunku Yakhal'inkomo Yakhal' Inkomo, Dedication to Daddy and more. 9 tracks 68:58. Yakhal'Inkomo is a cry of joy wrapped in a package of protest. Tenor saxophonist Winston Mankunku Ngozi did not choose the title by accident: it refers to the bellow of the bull as it is taken to slaughter. Did the censors in Pretoria grasp the title's meaning Doubtful. Play jigsaw puzzles for free Home. Yakhal' Inkomo, 2007. Yakhal' Inkomo, 08:52. Dedication To Daddy Trane & Brother Shorter, 06:44. Doodlin', 06:03. Bessie's Blues, 07:34. Before the Rain & After, 03:36. Look Up, 03:30. You Don't Know What Love Is, 08:16. Disc IDs 0. On the first side of this LP is Yakhal Inkomo one of his original works, literally translated Bellowing Bull. The sound of a bull bellowing mournfully at the loss of one of his kind, is one from deep down in the heart. It is with this sound captured musically, that Mankunku expresses his deep grief at the loss of one of the greatest tenor players in the world, Daddy Trane, as he calls the late John Coltrane. You Don't Know What Love Is - Winston Mankunku Ngozi. Лента с персональными рекомендациями и музыкальными новинками, радио, подборки на любой вкус, удобное управление своей коллекцией. Yakhal Inkomo 1968, with Lionel Pillay, Agrippa Magwaza, Early Mabuza. The Bull and The Lion 1976, with Mike Makhalemele, Trevor Rabin, Ronnie Robot and Neil Cloud. Winston Mankunku & Mike Perry Jika 1987, with Richard Pickett, Mike Campbell, Bheki Mseleku, Russell Herman, Claude Deppa, Lucky Ranku. Winston Mankunku & Mike Perry Dudula 1996, with Spencer Mbadu, Richard Pickett, Errol Dyers, Charles Lazar, Buddy Wells, Marcus Wyatt, Graham Beyer, The Merton Barrow String Quintet. Molo Africa 19971998, with Feya Faku, Tete Mbambisa, Errol Dyers, Basil Moses, Lionel Beukes and